BBC Sport gives a good example of British English sounding silly.

“Rodney So’oialo troops off as France celebrate victory.”
“France edge New Zealand out of world cup.”
“…England were penalised for hands in the ruck.”

Am I right?

Advertisements

2 thoughts on “BBC Sport gives a good example of British English sounding silly.

  1. Casseeeeeeeeeeee says:

    I hear ya. It’s hard teaching American English with some random bits of British stuff that come up periodically. I die a little when I have to say “I’ve got” or “Have you got any” instead of “I have” and “Do you have any”. Do you teach all British English, or American too?

  2. Hmm, well, I teach what I know. If I’m using a crazy word they don’t know (vacation for example) I explain what it means but I don’t start using the British one unless I don’t have time. I don’t think it’ll hurt them, in fact I think it’s good for them to know both, and the teachers I work with (though they teach British English) seem to feel the same way. I just, you know, can’t call my pants “trousers.”

What do you think?

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s