French Easter Eggs

Last Sunday I had Sunday brunch with two American friends, and we decided to try to dye our hard boiled eggs à l’américaine. (J swears the French paint their eggs too but I asked him how many times in his life he’d done that, and he said three times. So I think it’s fair to say it’s not a set in stone tradition.)

It was a very enlightening experience. Eggs are laid with a cuticle layer on them that apparently has protective qualities. In the States, this layer is washed off according to FDA regulations to prevent salmonella. In Europe, it can’t be washed off according to EU regulations, to prevent salmonella. Or something like that. In any case, even knowing this, it didn’t occur to me that the cuticle was actually visible and easy to wash off.

Eggs in dye before we noticed the cuticle that prevented the dye from taking to the shell

Eggs in dye before we noticed the cuticle that prevented the dye from taking to the shell

Egg with the cuticle layer on

Egg with the cuticle layer on, sort of peeling off

Egg in diluted vinegar to take off the cuticle

Egg in diluted vinegar to take off the cuticle

Egg after removal of cuticle later

Egg after removal of cuticle later

Egg 2 after cuticle removal

Egg 2 after cuticle removal

Fretty

Fretty

So, a very educational Easter.

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2 thoughts on “French Easter Eggs

  1. It never occurred to me that you couldn’t just dye French eggs. I mean, it makes sense, and I never tried before, but I never thought of it. And now I realize why my little students showed up covered in actual paint after coloring eggs.

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